Few of us like to think about dying, but equally few of us could live with the thought that we have not made adequate provision for family and friends who survive us.

The legislation that governs passing on your estate to your chosen beneficiaries requires you to plan well in advance. Since none of us knows when we shall die, this means making the necessary provisions now.

The earlier you make the arrangements, the greater your chance of taking full advantage of the tax opportunities available and thereby maximising the amount that goes to your beneficiaries. Nothing is more demoralising than the thought that a substantial slice of the wealth you have worked hard to accumulate will end up in the Government's coffers!

It is equally important when planning to transfer your estate that you make adequate provision for yourself and your spouse in your later years. Striking this balance calls for considerable skill and foresight - and a detailed knowledge of the tax regime


With the tax regime becoming more complex and more emphasis being put on taxpayers' individual responsibilities, everyone who is subject to taxation needs professional advice and support if they are to optimise their tax position and ensure they meet all the compliance requirements.

We are the tax specialists. We can provide you with year round tax advice on:

  • Income tax
  • Capital Gains tax
  • Inheritance tax
  • Trusts and estates
  • Non-domiciliary tax issues

Every pound of income tax you save means more income at your disposal, every well planned disposal of assets means minimal loss of capital gains, and every inheritance tax saving means more benefit for your beneficiaries.


Take full advantage of these tax planning tools

Trusts are extremely useful instruments for tax planning purposes. They are particularly useful for holding shares in private companies as part of a family financial or tax plan - especially if you want to reduce inheritance tax liability in your estate.

They can also be useful for:

  • Providing funds for your children's education, maintenance, etc.
  • Restricting access to property by future beneficiaries
  • Providing for people who are mentally or otherwise incapacitated
  • Gifting to charity

There are four main types of trust:

  1. Life interest trusts
  2. Discretionary trusts
  3. Accumulation and maintenance trusts
  4. Bare trusts

Each type of trust receives different tax treatment and can be adapted to many different purposes.

To take full advantage of trusts in your tax and estate planning you need to receive expert help and advice.

We can help you determine which types of trust are suited to your purposes, prepare the necessary documentation, and advise on appropriate trustees.